Food

Going Vegan

More people are becoming vegans, and Bali welcome them

It’s not easy turning into a vegetarian, let alone a vegan. You have to say adieu to your usual comfort food (i.e. grandma’s spicy roast chicken, fast food) that has been part of your daily diet since childhood, and you’ve to brace the fact that you might be the only vegetarian in your circle of carnivore friends.

However, there is a surge of veganism in the rest of the world. According to search data from Google Trends, the interest in veganism has been skyrocketing from 2004 to 2018, with Australia currently tracking as the third fastest growing vegan market in the world.

In Indonesia, naturally Bali has the edge due to its tourism industry that brings in many nationalities from countries whose vegan population is on the rise, including, that’s right, Australia.

Previously Ubud was the one area beloved by vegans, but now the hipster-friendly Canggu is catching up with the demand with the up- coming Bali Vegan Festival in October. “I think Bali is a paradise for raw foodies and vegans,” says Pauliina Salmenhaara, owner of the vegan café, Living Food Lab in Berawa. “I am not yet familiar with other areas outside of Bali, but there shouldn’t be any particular challenges in terms of ingredients.”

Previously going vegan seems to denote a counter-culture movement comprising of angry animal welfare activists, or tree-hugging silly hippies, but now it has gone beyond those negative boundaries. It’s simply a move towards a better, healthier lifestyle, with the reduction in animal farming (and safer to the environment) being a bonus.

Bali Pocket Magazine